Patenting in Biotechnology

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Description

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About this course: Far too often, researchers are misinformed about the role and the possibilities arising around patents and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). In this course we will teach you what IPR are - with a special focus on patents. Also this course will look at the importance of patents in the world of biotechnology - and what you actually can patent. Should your research be protected? Can your research even be protected? There are a lot of misunderstandings about patents, so first step is to know what patents really are and how they work. Then we will introduce how and when to apply for them. Also how to find existing patents is a crucial and necessary element to being able …

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: Biotechnology, Information Management, IT Management & Strategy, IT Security, and Governance.

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Far too often, researchers are misinformed about the role and the possibilities arising around patents and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). In this course we will teach you what IPR are - with a special focus on patents. Also this course will look at the importance of patents in the world of biotechnology - and what you actually can patent. Should your research be protected? Can your research even be protected? There are a lot of misunderstandings about patents, so first step is to know what patents really are and how they work. Then we will introduce how and when to apply for them. Also how to find existing patents is a crucial and necessary element to being able to assess whether your research should be protected or not. The course will be divided in 7 sessions, and at the end of the course, you should be able to: - describe the different types of IPR - explain the conditions of patentability for an invention - describe the various stages involved in a patent application - search and retrieve patent information from databases - read and understand a patent - write claims related to biotechnology - understand and explain the concept of Freedom To Operate Course Materials: You will need the following book as a reading material for the course: “Patenting in Biotechnology, a laboratory manual” by Peter Ulvskov, which will be available from http://polyteknisk.dk/home/Detaljer/9788750211068 Also, you will need to get access from your home institution to these databases: - Derwent Innovation Index (via Web of Science) - SciFinder NB: This course is related to a 5 ECTS point course that is a mandatory requirement for access to the BioBusiness and Innovation Platform (BBIP) program at the Copenhagen Business School. NOTE: this Coursera course will NOT be sufficient for attending the BBIP program but successful completion of this course (with a Course Certificate) will be a plus for applying to the BBIP. To obtain the 5 ECTS points, you will have to enrol as a DTU Student, participate on a hands-on workshop on patent databases and pass an exam in presence of an external Censor. For more information, please email me at: fdemasi@cbs.dtu.dk Link for BBIP: (http://www.cbs.dk/viden-samfundet/strategiske-indsatsomrader/biobusiness-and-innovation-platform-bbip)

Who is this class for: This course is aimed at Master and PhD students that want to learn about how to protect and create value from their current or future inventions. It is also a required course for students wanting to enrol in the BBIP Masters Programme at the Copenhagen Business School.

Created by:  Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen Business School
  • Taught by:  Federico De Masi, Senior Researcher

    Department of Bioinformatics - DTU
  • Taught by:  Peter Ulvskov, Professor

    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Copenhagen University
  • Taught by:  Karin Beukel

  • Taught by:  Claus Bøttcher Jørgensen, Professor

    Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences
  • Taught by:  Finn Valentin, Professor

    Research Centre on Biotech Business
Level Beginner Commitment 7 weeks for 2-4 hours week Language English How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6 stars Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said Coursework

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Technical University of Denmark (DTU) DTU focuses on research in technical and natural sciences that contributes to the development of society. As an industrially orientated university, our goal is to supply high-level international research based on combining theory with constructing models and empirical methods. Copenhagen Business School Centrally located in Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, Copenhagen Business School (CBS) is one of the largest business schools in Europe with close to 23,000 students. CBS offers world-class research-based degree programs at undergraduate, graduate, and PhD levels as well as executive and other post experience programs.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Introduction to Intellectual Property Rights
An introduction to the important subjects within the field of patenting, such as novelty and “person skilled in the art”. By Federico De Masi


5 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Video: About This Course (5:27)
  2. Video: The book and the databases
  3. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  4. Video: What is Intellectual Property (IP)? (13:27)
  5. Video: What Are Patents? (13:41)
  6. Video: What Is Novelty? (11:33)

Graded: Basic IP Quiz
Graded: Assessing Novelty

WEEK 2


The Patent System I
Get to know the important timeline for getting a patent. We look at the filing, international filing, examination, publication, and potential approval of a patent. Note that we will go deeper into the search machinery later in lecture 5. By Peter Ulvskov.


2 videos, 2 readings expand


  1. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  2. Reading: Patenting in Biotechnology
  3. Video: Document Types I - Making Patent Timelines (US) (23:20)
  4. Video: Document Types II - Making Patent Timelines (PCT) (22:10)

Graded: Using The Databases + Reading a Patent
Graded: Patent trees and families
Graded: Your Own Patent Timeline

WEEK 3


The Patent System II
The first video introduces search reports and looks into destruction of novelty/inventive steps. The second video covers international filling - the PCT system. The issues with medical use claims will also be discussed. By Peter Ulvskov.


2 videos, 2 readings expand


  1. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  2. Reading: Patenting in Biotechnology
  3. Video: Document Types II - All Documents I (24:05)
  4. Video: Document Types II - All Documents II (14:10)

Graded: Understanding the World of Patents
Graded: The filing process
Graded: Document Types
Graded: Analyse a Patent

WEEK 4


Creating a Patent Landscape



To map the patent landscape for an invention you need to be able to perform “literature search” for patents. This is important if you want to avoid infringing existing patents. In this lecture, different databases are reviewed: Derwent, USPTO, and NCBI. By Peter Ulvskov.


3 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  2. Video: Part I (Database: Derwent) (15:52)
  3. Video: Part II (Database: Patentscope) (14:30)
  4. Video: Part III (Database: USPTO and NCBI) (Genetic Sequences) (21:46)

Graded: Derwent User Interface
Graded: Derwent Boolean Algebra, Wildcards and Operator Precedence
Graded: Hierarchical Search Profiles in Derwent
Graded: Field Tags and Operators in USPTO and Patentscope
Graded: Hierarchical Search

WEEK 5


How to Patent Biotechnology Inventions?
Here we go through the interesting issues, rules and possibilities of patenting specific biotechnology related items as microorganisms or enzymes. By Claus Jørgensen.


1 video, 2 readings expand


  1. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  2. Reading: Patenting in Biotechnology
  3. Video: Sequences, Peptides, Enzymes, Antibodies, and Microorganisms (28:32)

Graded: Biotechnology Inventions
Graded: Patentability of Your Own Biotech Invention

WEEK 6


Business and Patents
How can we avoid infringing other patents and what are solutions in case we do? Freedom to operate (FTO) is in its essence to the constraints surrounding your invention that prevents your ability to produce/sell your invention. By Karin Beukel.


1 video expand


  1. Video: Freedom to Operate and Licensing Deals (21:42)

Graded: Freedom To Operate
Graded: Investigation of FTO for Your Own Biotech Invention

WEEK 7


Patenting Small Chemicals and Compounds
In this lecture the novelty of chemical molecules and natural products are discussed. An interesting real life example tried to but things in perspective. By Federico De Masi.


2 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Suggested reading from the book
  2. Video: Novelty for Small Molecules (15:22)
  3. Video: Natural Products (20:25)

Graded: Patenting Small Compounds

Searching Patents for Small Chemicals
Introduction to using SciFinder, an enormous database for chemical reactions and compounds. See how one utilizes Markus formulas to search for patents. By Peter Ulvskov.


1 video expand


  1. Video: Scifinder: Searches for Small Molecules (22:27)

Graded: Scifinder Search

Conclusion - Should You Patent Your Invention?
Philosophical lecture about the benefit of patenting and how to actually use your approved patent. Also importantly, we cover ALL the reasons to NOT patent! Definitely important even though we really love patents in this course.


3 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Video: Why / Why Not Patent? (14:02)
  2. Video: Conclusions (4:08)
  3. Video: Closing Remarks
  4. Reading: Extra reading from the book

Graded: Patenting Strategy
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