Community Change in Public Health

Product type
Logo Coursera (CC)
Provider rating: starstarstarstar_halfstar_border 7.2 Coursera (CC) has an average rating of 7.2 (out of 6 reviews)

Need more information? Get more details on the site of the provider.

Description

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health.

About the Course

In bringing about behavior change in public health, we often focus on the individual mother, student, or farmer. We should not forget the community structure and norms constrain for encouraging individual health behaviors. This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health. We begin by examining the various definitions of ‘community’ and the processes by which we ‘diagnose’ or seek to understand the structure and characteristics of different types of communities. An appreciation of community similarities and differences is necessary l…

Read the complete description

Frequently asked questions

There are no frequently asked questions yet. If you have any more questions or need help, contact our customer service.

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health.

About the Course

In bringing about behavior change in public health, we often focus on the individual mother, student, or farmer. We should not forget the community structure and norms constrain for encouraging individual health behaviors. This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health. We begin by examining the various definitions of ‘community’ and the processes by which we ‘diagnose’ or seek to understand the structure and characteristics of different types of communities. An appreciation of community similarities and differences is necessary lest we fall into the trap of designing one-size-fits-all interventions. We need to recognize that no matter that outsiders may view a community as poor or neglected, we can find strengths and capacities for improvement in each community. Identifying community capacities and resources is the first step in facilitating community change. Different practical and philosophical approaches to change and therefore, examined. Specific to the change process is our recognition of the need for communities to participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of any intervention. We examine the concept of participation in an effort to see how different levels of involvement may affect sustainability of community change efforts. Finally a case study of a community participatory approach to onchocerciasis control in Africa is presented. Community Directed Intervention has subsequently been successfully applied to providing other essential primary health care services by and in the community, such as insecticide treated bednets, malaria treatment, vitamin A distribution, deworming medicines, and pneumonia and diarrhea case management.

About the Instructor(s)

William Brieger is a Certified Health Education Specialist and has a Doctorate in Public Health (DrPH) in international health from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and a Masters in Public Health (MPH) from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a Professor in the Health Systems Program of the Department of International Health at The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and also serves as JHPIEGO’s Senior Malaria Specialist. Bill taught at the African Regional Health Education Center at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, from 1976 to 2002. He is internationally renowned for his expertise in the social and behavioral aspects of tropical disease control and prevention, with special emphasis on malaria, onchocerciasis and guineaworm. He has served as a consultant for the International Health Programs Office and the Malaria Branch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as malaria expert for the VOICES malaria advocacy project of The Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Communications Programs, and consultant to the World Bank, the African Program for Onchocerciasis Control, Unicef and various USAID implementing partners in the areas of tropical disease control, HIV/AIDS prevention, program evaluation and community participation. Bill is a member of the Mectizan Expert Committee that advises Merck’s Mectizan Donation Program onchocerciasis control efforts. Bill participated in the development and field testing of the original Roll Back Malaria Needs Assessment Instruments, developed background documents for the Abuja Summit, provided consultation on overcoming bottlenecks in Global Fund malaria grants in Nigeria, conducted malaria needs assessments in Ghana and Burkina Faso and provided team building training for the National Malaria Program in Mali, and participates in the RBM Harmonization Working Group. In addition, he teaches three internet-based courses: training methods/continuing education for health workers, urban health and social and behavioral foundations of primary health care in the distance education program of The Johns Hopkins University, and is one of the coordinators of the internet-based Certificate in Global Health of the Department of International Health. He has published more than 140 scientific articles including ones focused on the social and cultural aspects of disease control, training of community health workers and peer educators, and community participation strategies in disease control efforts ranging from including malaria, onchocerciasis and guinea worm. Bill also serves on the Editorial Boards of several peer reviewed journals and provides manuscript reviews for many scientific publications. At JHU he teaches courses on social and behavioral foundations of primary health care, training methods and continuation and urban health in developing countries.

Course Syllabus

After listening to, viewing, and studying the course materials, you will:
  • Provide a definition of community
  • Identify community components, characteristics, and typologies
  • Outline and explain the components of a community diagnosis
  • Explain the concept of perceived community/collective efficacy
  • Outline and describe the community competency model
  • Explain Rothman's model of community change
  • Note relationships of Rothman's model to other change models
  • Describe the levels of the political economy model
  • Give examples of a political economy interpretation to health problems
  • Define the concept of community coalitions
  • Identify the role of community participation in the Alma Ata Declaration
  • Provide examples of the effect of participation on program outcomes
  • Describe how coalitions can address urban health problems
  • Describe the levels of participation along a continuum
  • Distinguish between community-based and community-controlled programming

Recommended Background

A basic understanding of public health program planning is helpful but not required.

Course Format

The course will consist of lecture presentations to be viewed each week.

Course participants will have the opportunity to analyze and compare community change case studies using a worksheet provided for the purpose. Through completion of the lab, participants will diagnose a community's health and welfare as affected by the social system, political system, economic system, cultural system, and geographical system and analyze a community using an analysis sheet and compare two types of communities in regard to change. 

There will also be a short multiple choice quiz.

FAQ

  • What resources will I need for this class?

    There is no specific text book for the course. Optional articles and other reading materials will be provided with weblinks. If interested, class members can join a dedicated Facebook page where news and ideas about community and social change in public health are exchanged.

Provided by:

University: Johns Hopkins University

Instructor(s): William Brieger

There are no reviews yet.

Share your review

Do you have experience with this course? Submit your review and help other people make the right choice. As a thank you for your effort we will donate $1.- to Stichting Edukans.

There are no frequently asked questions yet. If you have any more questions or need help, contact our customer service.